February’s President’s Report – Welcome to 2015

Presidents Report Matthew Keogh

Happy New Year and welcome to the first edition of Brief for 2015, and my first report to you as President.

In a sense I started my duties as President in late 2014, with the honour of appearing on behalf of the profession and the Law Society at the special sitting of the Supreme Court in celebration of the great life and contribution to the law of the late former Chief Justice, David Malcolm AC QC CitWA. As I said then, “While David Malcolm’s passing is a sad time, today should be seen as a celebration of a life well lived in service of his clients, the profession, the law, and the state.”

Personally, I was never afforded the opportunity of appearing before Chief Justice Malcolm, having been admitted just two months after his retirement from the bench. Similarly, as the youngest President of the Society in its nearly 88 year history, I am not in the same cohort as other leaders of our profession, such as those in the judiciary, members of regulators or leading government. I think this is a good thing as it affords me a unique perspective on the issues we as a profession and community have to encounter and deal with, in particular, a longer term horizon. This also demonstrates the leadership of the Society in tackling the challenge of generational change, which can be a struggle for many organisations.

Read the full President’s Report

 

February’s President’s Report – Welcome to 2015

Happy New Year and welcome to the first edition of Brief for 2015, and my first report to you as President.

In a sense I started my duties as President in late 2014, with the honour of appearing on behalf of the profession and the Law Society at the special sitting of the Supreme Court in celebration of the great life and contribution to the law of the late former Chief Justice, David Malcolm AC QC CitWA. As I said then, “While David Malcolm’s passing is a sad time, today should be seen as a celebration of a life well lived in service of his clients, the profession, the law, and the state.”

Personally, I was never afforded the opportunity of appearing before Chief Justice Malcolm, having been admitted just two months after his retirement from the bench. Similarly, as the youngest President of the Society in its nearly 88 year history, I am not in the same cohort as other leaders of our profession, such as those in the judiciary, members of regulators or leading government. I think this is a good thing as it affords me a unique perspective on the issues we as a profession and community have to encounter and deal with, in particular, a longer term horizon. This also demonstrates the leadership of the Society in tackling the challenge of generational change, which can be a struggle for many organisations.

Read the full President’s Report